Services

Special Events

Guest Speaker: Dr. S. Matthew DeSpain

Rose State College Professor of History, Dr. S. Matthew DeSpain was a guest speaker at one of the Friends of the Library spring events. The title of his presentation, “Little Red Died for Your Sins," was appropriated from a 1969 Indian student activist banner in protest of OU’s Little Red mascot. The phrase derives from Vine Deloria's monumental work Custer Died For Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto (1969) that influenced the Red Power movement including Indian student actions against Little Red.

Dr. DeSpain's presentation explored how, over time, Native and non-Native students at OU appropriated and re-crafted Indian imagery, the eventual creation of Little Red, and the battle against him that divided Indian peoples in Oklahoma. In the end, OU abolished Little Red, but his end opened the way for better treatment of Indian students at OU.

Guest Speaker: Thomas Brent Smith

Thomas Brent Smith is director of the Petrie Institute of Western American Art at the Denver Art Museum. He previously served as curator of art of the American West at the Tucson Museum of Art, where he organized the exhibition A Place of Refuge: Maynard Dixon’s Arizona and authored the companion publication.

Since joining the DAM in November of 2008, Smith has overseen the implementation of exhibitions and programs including The Masterworks of Charles M. Russell: A Retrospective of Paintings and Sculpture (2009), Charles Deas and 1840’s America (2010), Ed Ruscha: On the Road (2012) and was curator of Western Horizons: Selections from the Contemporary Realism Collection (2011) Theodore Waddell’s Abstract Angus (2012), and Rocky Mountain Majesty: The Paintings of Charles Partridge Adams (2012) and co-curator of Thomas Moran’s Yellowstone: A Project for the Nation (2013). Smith is also co-curator of The American West in Bronze: 1850-1925 which opened at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in December 2013 and appeared at the Denver Art Museum in May 2014 before traveling on to Nanjing, China.

Additionally, Smith is the vision behind the highly successful symposia Shaping the West: American Sculptors in the 19th Century, A Distant View: European Perspectives on Western American Art, Lest We Forget California: Artists in the Golden West, Decades: An Expanded Context for Western American Art, 1900-1940, and Journeys West. Smith serves as editor of the Institute’s annual publication Western Passages, overseeing the production of Charlie Russell and Friends (2009), Shaping the West: American Sculptors in the 19th Century (2010), Elevating Western American Art: Developing an Institute in the Cultural Capital of the Rockies (2012), and Decades: An Expanded Context for Western American Art, 1900-1940 (2013).

Smith played a central role in the department’s endowment campaign, which was completed in 2010. He also helped to bring the recent gift of the Henry Roath collection to the DAM — it was one of the most important gifts in the museum’s history and approximately doubled the value and importance of the Institute’s holdings.

Guest Speaker: Gov. Frank Keating

Former Oklahoma Gov. Frank Keating gave a lecture entitled “Leading in Crisis: The Oklahoma City Bombing.”

Born in Tulsa, Frank Keating received his undergraduate degree from Georgetown University and his law degree from the University of Oklahoma.  His 30-year career in law enforcement and public service included stints as an FBI agent, U.S. Attorney and state prosecutor, Oklahoma House and Senate member, and governor of Oklahoma.

He served Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush in the Treasury, Justice and Housing departments. His Justice and Treasury service gave him responsibility for all federal criminal prosecutions in the nation and oversight over agencies such as the Secret Service, U.S. Customs, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, U.S. Marshals, the Bureau of Prisons and the immigration and Naturalization Service and all 94 U.S. Attorneys. 

He served two terms as Oklahoma’s 25th governor. As the governor of Oklahoma, Keating won national acclaim in 1995 for his compassionate and professional handling of the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal building in Oklahoma City. In the aftermath of the tragedy, he raised more than $6 million to fund scholarships for the nearly 200 children left with only one parent or no parents. 

Keating is president and CEO of the American Bankers Association, a 135-year-old association that represents banks of all sizes and charters and is the voice for the nation’s $13 trillion banking industry and its two million employees. 

Currently, Keating is chairman of the Advisory Board of Mt. Vernon and serves on the boards of the National Archives, the Jamestown Foundation and the Bipartisan Policy Center.  Keating is also the author of four award-winning children’s books, biographies of Will Rogers, Theodore Roosevelt, George Washington, and Standing Bear, the Ponca Indian chief who argued Native Americans deserve the same rights as white Americans.  He is the recipient of six honorary degrees.

He and his wife Cathy live in McLean, Virginia.  They have three children and 10 grandchildren.

Forever Free: Abraham Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation will be on display at the Rose State College Learning Resources Center between August 23 and October 3, 2011. The exhibit, which re-examines President Lincoln's thoughts about slavery, was set up in six panels that focused on:

•young Lincoln's America,
•the House dividing,
•war for the Union,
•the Emancipation Proclamation,
•the role of black soldiers in the Civil War, and
•the final months of the Civil War and Lincoln's life.

Included in the exhibition are rare documents and the latest research that that will take viewers through Lincoln's journey to Emancipation: he was at first a cautious moderate who was willing to allow slavery to continue if it would help preserve the Union, but when this approach failed, he became determined that freeing the slaves immediately was necessary and thus issued the Emancipation Proclamation.

In conjunction with "Forever Free" exhibit, the Learning Resources Center also will display materials on Abraham Lincoln from the collection.

In the exhibit are photographs of the sanitary fair, an actual raffle ticket and other rarities, as well as pamphlets, sheet music and cartoons depicting public reactions to the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation.

The Forever Free exhibit will be on display on the second floor of the Rose State College Learning Resources Centerte Library in the fall of 2011, from August 23 – October 3, 2011.

Exhibit: "Forever Free: Abraham Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation"

"Forever Free: Abraham Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation" was on display in the Learning Resources Center Aug. 23-Oct. 3, 2011. The exhibit, which re-examined President Lincoln's thoughts about slavery, was set up in six panels that focused on:

• Young Lincoln's America
• The House dividing
• War for the Union
• The Emancipation Proclamation
• The role of black soldiers in the Civil Wa
• The final months of the Civil War and Lincoln's life

Included in the exhibition were rare documents and the latest research that took viewers through Lincoln's journey to Emancipation: He was at first a cautious moderate who was willing to allow slavery to continue if it would help preserve the Union, but when this approach failed, he became determined that freeing the slaves immediately was necessary and thus issued the Emancipation Proclamation.

In conjunction with "Forever Free" exhibit, the Learning Resources Center also displayed materials on Abraham Lincoln from the collection. Included in the exhibit were photographs of the sanitary fair, an actual raffle ticket and other rarities, as well as pamphlets, sheet music and cartoons depicting public reactions to the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Exhibit: A Fine Romance

This was a traveling exhibit about the contributions of iconic Jewish songwriters such as Jerome Kern, Irving Berlin, Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein. It celebrated American popular song during the period 1910-1965. The best musical artists of the time combined a genius for melody, a talent for pairing melody with the perfect words, and an ability to connect with a wide audience. A remarkably high percentage of them were Jewish, from families that had immigrated to America in the 1800s or fled pogroms and persecution in Europe at the turn of the century. "A Fine Romance" tells their story, using lively and striking images from Broadway musicals, classic films, posters, and personal collections.

Local supporters included the Jewish Federation of Greater Oklahoma City, Temple B’nai Israel, the Jewish Foundation of Oklahoma City, Friends of the RSC Library, and several anonymous donors. "A Fine Romance: Jewish Songwriters, American Songs, 1910-1965" was developed by Nextbook, Inc., a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting Jewish literature, culture and ideas, and the American Library Association Public Programs Office. The national tour of the exhibit was made possible by grants from the Charles H. Revson Foundation, the Righteous Persons Foundation, the David Berg Foundation and an anonymous donor, with additional support from Tablet Magazine: A New Read on Jewish Life.