Nursing Science

FAQs

Does acceptance to RSC or taking the required pre-requisite courses guarantee admission to the Nursing Science Program?

No. There are a limited number of positions available in the Program. Program admission is through a specific application process. The applicant pool is very competitive and not every applicant is accepted.  An applicant can improve chances of getting accepted by increasing points earned on the admission Points Criteria (see the appropriate Program Advisement for explanation.) 

Do I have to take all of the general education and support courses before I can apply? 

No.  There are some, however, which are required pre-requisites and must be completed before the student can be enrolled in the program (see the appropriate Program Advisement for a complete list.) However, because there are limited positions in the program and the applicant pool is very competitive, a point system is used for selection of applicants for admission. An applicant can increase points, thus improving chances of selection, by completion of coursework prior to applying for admission.

Do I have to have all of the pre-requisite courses completed before I can apply?

No, but you must have them all completed prior to the scheduled enrollment date for the semester you hope to start the program.  For example, if you apply during the February application period, you must have all the required pre-requisite courses completed by the end of the following summer session.  If you apply during the August application period, you must have all of the required pre-requisite courses completed by the end of that fall session. The applicant must provide proof of completion of all pre-requisites on or before the enrollment date.

If I take the general education courses ahead of time, can I complete the program faster?

No. Even though you must take some general education courses prior to your acceptance in to the program, you still must complete the Nursing Science Program courses in sequence. The courses are arranged so the content covered in the course builds upon content covered in the previous courses. Courses are not offered out of order. The program length, once admitted, is four (4) semesters in length for the Beginning Track and two (2) semesters in length for the Career Ladder Track.

Do I have to take any tests to apply to the program?

All applicants must provide proof of meeting the admission requirements on the Reading, Writing, and Math (pre-algebra) placement tests. Those tests are given in Enrollment and Specialized Testing located in the Student Services Building, room 204.  There is no cost for taking the tests but if re-testing is needed, the student will incur a fee.  The test requires approximately 1½ hours for completion.  The Testing Center is generally open Monday 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., Tuesday through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., and Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Contact the Testing Center at 733-7320 for information.

All paramedics, military medics, and some LPNs are also required to take and pass the LPN/Medic Challenge Exam. The exam does not have to be completed prior to application but must be successfully completed to be eligible for enrollment in the program if accepted.  The exam is only given twice a year, once in February and once in September. Pre-registration for this exam is required. The pre-registration deadline is February 1 for the February exam date and September 1 for the September exam date. 

Please see the advisement for the test for more information at: https://www.rose.edu/content/academics/academic-divisions/health-sciences/nursing-science/    

If I have already completed English and math classes, do I still have to take assessment tests for reading, writing and math?

Yes.  An applicant must prove achievement of the minimum scores required on the Compass or Accuplacer reading, writing, and math assessment tests in order to be considered for admission to the program. These scores can be no more than three (3) years old at the time of application.

Do I need to turn in my immunization records with my application?

No. Once you are accepted into the Nursing Program you will receive your acceptance letter which explains the immunizations and clinical requirements you must submit. The deadline for submission of these records will be stated in your letter, usually 4 to 6 weeks before the start of class. Early submission of clinical requirements is necessary to allow time for evaluation of your records and submission to the clinical facilities within their required timeframe. The list of requirements can be found in the appropriate Advisement.  Students are encouraged to review this list and ensure that they can provide the required documentation prior to enrollment.

I have CPR training from the American Red Cross. Will that meet the CPR requirement?

No. The clinical facilities require that CPR training be from the American Heart Association HealthCare Provider. Information regarding locations for completion of this requirement can be obtained at the Nursing Program Office located in the Health Sciences Center room 152, or the Health Sciences Division Office, Health Sciences Center room 100.

Do I need to submit reference letters with my application? Will they help my application?

No. Reference letters are not required and will not improve an applicant’s chances of getting accepted into the program. The only exception is for a student who has previously been enrolled in another nursing program.  That student must provide at the time of application a recommendation letter from the director of the other nursing program.

What if my GPA is low because of some bad grades in classes, can I still get in?

You must meet the College requirements for admission before we can consider you as an applicant to the Nursing Science Program.  For application purposes to the program, GPA is calculated using only the best grade earned by the applicant in courses that are part of the Nursing Science Degree plan.  No other grades will be calculated in to the GPA for points.  It is the student’s responsibility to supply official transcripts (or true copies can be substituted) including the applicant’s RSC transcript, with the application so that the GPA can be accurately calculated.

Do I get to count the classes I am enrolled in at the time I apply?

No. Classes that the student is enrolled in at the time of application do not count toward GPA or course completion points. If any of those classes are included in the requirements that must be completed prior to enrollment, the student must provide proof of completion on or before enrollment if accepted.

How do I know whether the coursework I’ve already completed will transfer and apply to the program?

Many courses complete at in-state institutions have been compared for equivalency. An applicant can check transferability of in-state credits using the Course Equivalency Project at:   

http://www.okhighered.org/student-center/transfer-stdnts/course-transfer.shtml. 

All students seeking to transfer credits from an out of state college or university, or any student who still has question about transferability, MUST request a Degree Audit through the Office of Admissions to determine if coursework completed is comparable and applicable toward the degree requirements for the Nursing Science Program. NOTE: 2-4 weeks is required for processing of the audit. This audit MUST be included with the application for admission to the Nursing Science Program for the coursework to be considered in the GPA and course completion points awarded.

How do I know whether the coursework I’ve already completed will transfer and apply to the program?

Many courses complete at in-state institutions have been compared for equivalency. An applicant can check transferability of in-state credits using the Course Equivalency Project at:

http://www.okhighered.org/student-center/transfer-stdnts/course-transfer.shtml. 

All students seeking to transfer credits from an out of state college or university, or any student who still has question about transferability, MUST request a Degree Audit through the Office of Admissions to determine if coursework completed is comparable and applicable toward the degree requirements for the Nursing Science Program. NOTE: 2-4 weeks is required for processing of the audit. This audit MUST be included with the application for admission to the Nursing Science Program for the coursework to be considered in the GPA and course completion points awarded.

How many are accepted into the program each semester?

Applications are accepted for admission to the program in the spring (February 1 – March 1) and fall semesters (August 1 – September 1.)  Applications are accepted for the traditional program option during both application periods.  Applications for the evening/weekend program option are only accepted during the spring application period.  Applications for the online program option are only accepted during the fall application period. Career Ladder Track admissions varies each semester and is dependent upon the number of Beginning Track students who progress into the third semester.  Admissions into the program are as follows:

Fall Admissions

Spring Admissions

Beginning Track Traditional -- 20

Beginning Track Traditional -- 20

Beginning Track Eve/Wknd -- 10

Beginning Track Online -- 10

Career Ladder Track Traditional – minimum 10

Career Ladder Track Traditional --  minimum 10

Career Ladder Track Eve/Wknd – minimum  10

Career Ladder Track Online – minimum 10

Is the program offered on a part-time schedule? 

No.  General education and support coursework can be completed prior to starting in the Nursing Program and those can be completed on a part-time basis.  However, if a student has completed all of the general education and support coursework prior to starting in the Nursing Program, the student will then be enrolled in only the nursing courses each semester which totals 8 credit hours/semester for the first three (3) semesters and 10 credit hours in the final semester of the program.

If I don’t get in, is there a waiting list?

The applicant list is kept until all spots are filled and the semester begins. If you are not selected, you must apply again during the next application period.

What do I have to do to re-apply?

Application materials are retained on file for a period of three (3) years. However, you will need to submit a new application along with updated supporting documents as appropriate. Example of updated documents include transcripts showing additional coursework completed since last application, Accuplacer scores (if yours are >3 years old or you improved them), and/or work letter documenting experience completed since last application.  

Does it help or hurt my application if I re-apply?

Applicants who are not accepted are encouraged to schedule an advisement appointment to discuss ways to become a more competitive applicant. Many applicants are encouraged to finish prerequisites and/or consider options for strengthening their GPA's prior to reapplying. Applicants are allowed and often encouraged to reapply to the program. Re-applying does not hurt a person’s chances of getting accepted.

When are admission decisions released?

All applicants should expect to receive a response letter regarding the outcome of their application.  Those who are accepted from the spring (February) applicant pool are typically notified around mid-April.  Those who are accepted from the fall (August) applicant pool are typically notified around the end of November.

If I am an LPN or medic, how long is the program for me?

Career Ladder Track students are admitted into the third semester of the program, after completion of all pre-requisite requirements, and graduate after completion of the fourth semester of the program.

Am I too old (or too young) to start the program?

The average age of the student enrolled in the Nursing Science Program is 33 although ages range from early 20’s to upper 60’s.  The majority of students in the Nursing Science Program are working adults who have multiple responsibilities.  The student body is ethnically diverse and composed of approximately 70% female and 30% male students.

Do I get to pick where and when I go to clinical?

Nursing Students attend clinical rotations in clinical groups, usually consisting of 8 to 10 people. The Nursing Science Program utilizes a variety of clinical sites within the Oklahoma City metropolitan area appropriate for achievement of the clinical course objectives for the semester. Please note that clinical rotations are determined by the clinical facilities and subject to their availability and needs. Your preference of site and day/time may not be an option offered for your semester.

Students select a clinical group at the time of enrollment. A schedule of clinical site/day/time options is provided ahead of time for students to review. Your enrollment time is assigned once you have submitted all of your immunization records and met clinical requirements. The quicker you complete this, the higher up on the enrollment list you will be.  You will be able to select from the days, times and locations based on what’s available at the time you come to enroll.  If you miss your enrollment time, you will be selecting from what is left to choose from. 

Can I complete the program without doing clinical?

No, clinical rotations are a required part of the program. You must complete and pass the theory and clinical component of each course to be eligible for graduation from the program.

Can I complete the program if I live out of state?

Yes, we have students who enroll and complete the program while living out of state. Most of those students enroll and complete the program through the online option. However, some students have elected to live in RSC student housing while completing the program. Every course has clinical requirements that must be completed here in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Clinicals typically require that the student be at the clinical site one (1) day out of each week. In addition, students must be able to travel to campus to complete some laboratory experiences. Examinations are given in a proctored setting as well and unless a student can identify a suitable proctor in their area, the student must be able to travel to campus to complete examinations with the class.

What is the difference between an RN with an Associate Degree and an RN with a Baccalaureate Degree?

The Registered Nurse (RN) license is considered a general practice certification. Coursework in all registered nursing programs is to provide students a thorough background for practice in a variety of specialty areas. Graduates of all registered nursing programs apply to take the same licensure exam, the NCLEX-RN, and once licensed, are eligible to apply for employment in a variety of settings including specialty areas such as obstetrics, pediatrics, surgery, critical care, home health and hospice. Baccalaureate Degree programs require additional general education and support coursework above what’s required for the Associate Degree and nursing coursework includes additional credit hours in community health nursing, administration and research. 

Can I work while I am completing the nursing program?

It is understood that, for some students, continuing to work is a necessity.  However, it is advisable to make every effort to reduce work schedules to no more than 20 hours/week in order to allow enough available time for class attendance, study time, and completion of homework assignments.  Flexible scheduling will be a necessity.  For further information, please schedule an advisement appointment with the Program Director or Assistant Director by calling 736-0337.